Why Restore?

Research & Collections
 

Giving Madison's Home Back to the American People

In 1984 Marion duPont Scott's heirs transferred the Montpelier estate to the National Trust for Historic Preservation in accordance with her wishes. Currently Montpelier is operated and managed by the Montpelier Foundation, a group that entered into a co-stewardship agreement with the National Trust in 2000. As part of the new agreement, the Montpelier Foundation was responsible for interpreting the estate to the public, a job that eventually lead them to ask if it was possible to restore the mansion back to its appearance in Madison's time.

Rationale for Restoration

After an intensive 18-month investigation into the evolution of the house, it was determined that enough physical evidence had survived to accurately restore Madison's house at Montpelier. This evidence included nail holes that showed the original location for walls, the identification of re-used Madison-era windows and trim, plaster outlines showing the size and location of missing mantels as well as many other elements that survived the duPont renovations and additions.

 

A Partnership with the National Trust

The Montpelier estate was transferred to the National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1984 after the death of Marion duPont Scott. In 2000, The Montpelier Foundation was created and entered into a co-stewardship agreement with the Trust. The Foundation currently operates and manages James Madison's Montpelier.